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The Duncan Download Blog: Business Aviation Advice & Observations

Duncan Aviation Releases March Duncan Intelligence

Posted by Duncan Download Blog on Thu, Mar 09, 2017 @ 09:00 AM

Have you heard about the Honeywell HTF7500E Stator Vane Seal Inspection Program? How about the cause behind those intermittent software failures on your Avidyne EX-500 MFD? 

No? Then you haven't read the March issue of the Duncan Intelligence. 

 March Duncan Intelligence

Falcon 7X Flap Rigging Precautions

 Caution is needed when rigging the flaps on a Dassaut Falcon 7X aircraft.

ADS-B Solution for Bombardier Challenger 800/850 SE Aircraft

 This was an industry-first installation in the United States and was performed in the customer’s hangar.

Honeywell HTF7500E Stator Vane Seal Inspection Program

 This inspection program is applicable to the HTF750E model engine.

Why Is My Avidyne EX-500 MFD Experiencing Intermittent Software Failures?

 Completing a proper shutdown every time will prevent this.

Got a crack in your APU Exhaust Support? Don’t Replace It. Repair It.

 Duncan Aviation has AWS D17.1 certified welders and inspectors on-site, all capable of welding all types of materials for aerospace applications.

The NBAA Tech Committee Wants To Hear From You

Progress can only be accomplished if we have regular interaction with and feedback from you, the Citation operator.

Get The Duncan Intelligence In Your In-box

The Duncan Intelligence is a free, technical newsletter for business aircraft owners and operators. Written in-house by Duncan Aviation's technical representatives, each edition includes technical tips and advice on topics and trends in business aviation. It is a free, monthly e-mail subscription for aviation enthusiasts around the world.

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Tags: Avionics & Instruments, Engine Maintenance, ADS-B, Falcon, Challenger

Honeywell HTF7000 Service Bulletin Update

Posted by Duncan Download Blog on Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 08:00 AM

For the Honeywell HTF7000 series engine model, there are a number of Service Bulletins that have become hot items. These can be accomplished at our Turbine Engine services shop in Lincoln, Nebraska, or any one of our Engine Rapid Response locations across the United States.

HTF700_2

SB AS907-76-9021

Issued on May 13, 2016, this SB addresses the possibility of water entering the ECUs (Electronic Control Unit) after the aircraft is parked in the rain for an extended length of time. This may lead to unscheduled maintenance and expenses, aircraft dispatch delays, Loss of Thrust Control (LOTC) events and the possibility for inflight shut downs.

This is a CAT 1 SAFETY SB meaning it may require urgent action and may be associated with an FAA AD (Airworthiness Directive). Compliance is recommended to be within 400 engine operating hours or 18 months from the date the SB was issued.

This SB is relevant to the following aircraft:

  • Bombardier Challenger 300/350 (HTF 7000/HTF 7350)
  • Gulfstream G280 (HTF 7250)
  • Embraer Legacy 450/500 (HTF 7500)

SB AS907-72-9064

This SB was issued to address instances of corrosion and pitting found in the inner and outer bypass ducts and supports. This SB will inspect and evaluate the corrosion and pitting of the FWD and AFT Ducts as well as the Core Cowls. If corrosion is noted, we will perform a repair to add a coat of paint as a preventive barrier for future contamination.

Because this SB requires the removal of the forward and aft outer fan bypass duct(s) and mid and aft inner fan duct panels, it should be scheduled during a maintenance event that will have the aircraft down for 7 to 10 days. I recommend accomplishing SB AS907-72-9044 at the same time, if applicable and you meet the required interval per the bulletin. Another good time to schedule this bulletin is during a 4000 hour digital borescope inspection. If repairs are noted from the borescope, most of these ducts and panels would be removed for the repair of the hot section components.

The SB applies to the following engines:

  • AS907-1-1A (Bombardier Challenger 300)
  • AS907-2-1G (Gulfstream G280)
  • AS907-2-1A (Bombardier Challenger 350)

HTF700_1SB AS907-72-9044

The SB replaces the engine combustion chamber assembly. I recommend you have this SB accomplished at the same time as the previous SB mentioned (SB AS907-72-9064), if applicable and you meet the required interval per the bulletin. Most of the same panels and ducts need to be removed for both.

SB AS907-76-9013 W5

This SB changes the location of the W5 & OSSD (Overspeed Shutoff Detector) wire harness to increase its reliability and prevent failure in the high-heat environment in the engine.

Honeywell Engine Technical Support

Shawn Schmitz-DA15090901.jpgShawn Schmitz

Engine Technical Representative

+1.402.479.8166 office

+1.402.730.8767 mobile

Shawn.Schmitz@DuncanAviation.com

Tags: Engine Maintenance

Duncan Aviation Releases December Duncan Intelligence

Posted by Duncan Download Blog on Thu, Dec 15, 2016 @ 10:43 AM

Did you know that we have the exclusive rights to reconfigure AIM® 1100/1200 series attitude indicators and gyros to meet your platform requirements? 

Have you heard that legacy aircraft operators have another transponder option to meet the ADS-B mandates?  

No? Then you haven't read the December issue of the Duncan Intelligence.

Didn't receive the Duncan Intelligence? Subscribe Now

 
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HTF7000 Service Bulletin Update

There are a number of Honeywell HTF7000 SBs that have become hot items. These can be accomplished at our Turbine Engine services shop, or any one of our Engine Rapid Response locations across the United States.

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Don’t Delay When Sending Control Rod Assemblies In For Repair/Overhaul

If these units are ever pulled for operational failure, they should be sent in immediately for evaluation. The longer they sit, the more likely corrosion will invade causing more problems at disassembly.

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NXT-700 Mode S Transponder Satisfies the DO-260B Mandate for ADS-B

The ACSS NXT-700 AML STC is complete and ready to meet the ADS-B mandate for many legacy aircraft operators.

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AIM (Extant) Attitude Indicators Repair/Mod/Loaner Capabilities

We have the exclusive rights to reconfigure these loaner units to meet the lighting, power configurations, and tilt angles based on your platform requirements.

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Keeping Out-Of-Production Parts Available

When these units require replacement, your only options are to: 1) buy a whole new servo unit or 2) upgrade the entire avionics package of the aircraft.

Tags: Parts & Accessories, Avionics & Instruments, Engine Maintenance, NextGen

A Customer's Simple Act Speaks Louder Than Words of Praise

Posted by Diane Heiserman on Tue, Nov 22, 2016 @ 08:00 AM

Earlier this year at our Lincoln, Nebraska, facility, we re-installed three Honeywell TFE731-60 engines fresh from their initial 3,000 hour MPI on their Falcon 900EX, that delivered on-time from its major C-inspection. The aircraft’s first scheduled flight back in rotation was a trip to Europe.

With decades of honed turbine engine skills, we experience very few surprises when it comes to Honeywell TFE731 engines and MPIs. However flying that far right after a major inspection is significant.

According to Jeff Schwebke, Duncan Aviation Engine Project Manager, most operators fly locally around their home base after MPIs are performed to make sure there are no minor squawks to work through. “This simple action by a long-time Duncan Aviation customer says more about their trust in our work than glowing words of praise,” he says.

With an average of 192 MPIs a year for the last 15 years, experience has told us which parts should be ordered in advance, what components need a closer look, and how to put together a team of trained turbine engine technicians ready to get to work for every customer.

9-engine1 - Copy.jpg9-engine3 - Copy.jpg9-engine2 - Copy.jpg9-engine4 - Copy.jpg

With the triple MPIs completed, engines re-installed, and post-MPI performance runs, the customer’s aircraft departed with better engine performance than it had when it arrived.

Watch this time-lapse video and follow along as the engines make their way through the Duncan Aviation turbine engine shop for this triple MPI event.

35+ years

Duncan Aviation began servicing the first generation TFE731-2 engines in the early 1970s. In 1981, we received two major level authorizations to work on the Honeywell (then AiResearch) TPE331 and TFE731 engines. Over the years, as Honeywell added different TFE731 model engines, each was added to our capabilities.

Duncan Aviation's Honeywell Engine Authorizations, include: 

  • Heavy Authorization on TFE731-2,-3,-4,-5,-20,-40,-50,-60 engines
  • Minor Authorization on Honeywell AS907 (HTF 7000) Series 
  • Line Authorization on CFE738 Engines, GTCP36-100/150, RE100 series and RE220 series APUs.
Here’s to another 35 years of dedicated Honeywell service!

Tags: Engine Maintenance, Videos

Did You Hear? Duncan Aviation Made a Heavy Announcement!

Posted by Sharon Klose on Mon, Oct 31, 2016 @ 02:00 PM


phone.jpgWithin 24 hours of Duncan Aviation’s Honeywell Heavy Maintenance Authorization announcement, my cell phone and email blew up with messages of congratulations from friends, colleagues, and industry contacts.

They were all happy for us!

“Great news!”

“Congratulations!”

“Excellent news.”

Most were not surprised.

“Congratulations on the Heavy Maintenance! It has been a long time coming.”

“Congrats to Duncan Aviation getting the heavy ticket, I knew it was just a matter of time.”

“About time, Duncan Aviation.”

“Congratulations. This will be great for Duncan Aviation, Honeywell and the CUSTOMER!”

“This is a game-changer!”

And this guy is ready to ink the deal!

“Wonderful news! When can I send my engines for a Core Zone Inspection? I want to be the first engine in the door!”

TFE-Shop.gifI’ve been in this industry for a LOT of years and talked to even more people. But it never gets old to hear appreciation from your peers. It’s having friends and business associates like these that continued to drive us towards expanding Duncan Aviation Turbine Engine Services knowing full well that if "we build it" they may come.

Speaking of building things, did you hear our other Minor announcement?

Our MRO in Lincoln, Nebraska, is now a Honeywell AS907 (HTF 7000) Series Minor Maintenance facility.

We have been a Honeywell Authorized Service Center for more than 30 years. Now we have Heavy Authorization on TFE731-2,-3,-4,-5,-20,-40,-50,-60 engines and Line Authorization on CFE738 Engines, GTCP36-100/150, RE100 series and RE220 series APUs.

Thank you for your support.

Thank you for your business.

Most importantly, thank you for your friendship.

If you happen to be at NBAA in Orlando, Florida, this week, I would love for you to stop by and see me.

Tags: Engine Maintenance

Honeywell Releases AS907 SAFETY Service Bulletin

Posted by Duncan Download Blog on Tue, Jul 19, 2016 @ 09:00 AM

AS907_HTF7000_-01.jpgHoneywell has released SB (Service Bulletin) AS 907-76-9021 Rev 0 dated May 13, 2016, regarding the possibility of water entering the ECUs (Electronic Control Unit) after the aircraft is parked in the rain for an extended length of time. This may lead to unscheduled maintenance and expense, aircraft dispatch delays, Loss of Thrust Control (LOTC) events and the possibility for inflight shut downs.

 

 

This SB is relevant to the following aircraft:

  • Bombardier Challenger 300 (HTF 7000)
  • Bombardier Challenger 350 (HTF 7350)
  • Gulfstream G280 (HTF 7250)
  • Embraer Legacy 450 (HTF 7500)
  • Embraer Legacy 500 (HTF 7500)

Honeywell has categorized this as a CAT 1 SAFETY SB meaning it may require urgent action and may be associated with an FAA AD (Airworthiness Directive). With that being said, this SB, under the Compliance Section E, has recommended compliance be within 400 engine operating hours or 18 months from the date the SB was issued. 

The compliance is to access the ECUs and apply sealant to specifically identified areas on the ECUs.  The job is estimated at 5.5 hours per side.

This can be easily accomplished by Duncan Aviation’s Engine Rapid Response teams or during a regular scheduled airframe maintenance event.

Welcoming the Honeywell HTF7000 Minor Maintenance Authorization

Read More About It

Tags: Engine Maintenance

Duncan Aviation & The Art of Minimizing Downtime

Posted by Diane Heiserman on Thu, May 26, 2016 @ 10:24 AM

Simplifying A Puzzle of Complexity

Puzzle.jpgEver put together a 1,000 piece puzzle? How about one with no straight-edges or picture on the box? What if you only had a couple of hours to finish and the pieces kept changing shape? Sounds a little daunting, if not impossible doesn’t it. Yet this is a daily scenario at Duncan Aviation.

Getting Downtime…Down

Operations Planning Coordinators, Brian Barto, Doug Schmitt, and Jason Kinnan have the difficult job of identifying and pulling together all the loose pieces of every aircraft maintenance event at our Battle Creek, MI, Lincoln, NE, and Provo, UT, facilities to determine an appropriate downtime. On any given day, they may have 35-40 schedules to plan.

They are only able to do this with the help of a very skilled team members who are aware of every shop’s maintenance capabilities and the capacity of work that can be expected. They communicate directly with Project Managers, Team Leaders, and Tech Reps.

They know the work required, the manpower necessary, and the time needed to satisfy the customer’s need for the shortest downtime, while maintaining the quality of work they expect from us.

Read more Duncan Aviation Airframe Maintenance

Hitting the Ground Running

Because of the hard work these teams do prior to every customer’s arrival, all the factory-trained technicians assigned are knowledgeable and well-prepared to begin work immediately upon touchdown with all necessary tools and parts assembled. This is a result of hours of team members being in constant communication with each other, making sure that all work is done in the most efficient time, with no overlaps and minimal interruptions.

“We are very aware that downtime is of high importance to customers. That makes it a high priority to us, as well,” says Shawn Busby, Project Manager. “Because we are a full-service maintenance facility, we have the advantage of doing all that is required under one roof in the shortest amount of time. It also requires a higher level of communication and teamwork so we are able to reduce downtime, increase efficiency and save our customers money.”

Read more Duncan Aviation Avionics Install

Unmatched

“Our engine capabilities are so inclusive that other FBO operations use Duncan Aviation engine team members to support them,” said Mike Bernholtz, Turbine Engine Service Sales Rep. “It is difficult for them to match our expertise, capabilities and downtime with our factory authorizations for Honeywell TFE731, HTF7000 and APUs; Pratt & Whitney 300 series, 500 series, 600 series, JT15, and PT6; Williams International and General Electric CF34.”

Read more Duncan Aviation Turbine Engine Services

You Get What You Pay For

We understand that budgets are tight and you want the best value, but don’t mistake the lowest price tag as your best option. When it comes to considering an MRO for aircraft paint or interior refurbishment work, you really do get what you pay for. “We have seen customers go with the lowest offer in order to save money. But end up having to pay more for services their chosen facilities are incapable of providing,” says Suzanne Hawes, Completions Sales Rep.

Read more Duncan Aviation Interior Completions

“In the case of hidden damage and corrosion, if the low-cost service provider does not have engineering and structural capabilities, the customer ends up having to hire a separate engineering consultant to assess the damage. And potentially even a third facility to do the structural repairs..  

At Duncan Aviation we have the experience, that if the damage is beyond tolerance, we work directly with the OEMs to create a repair disposition and have a structures team able to complete the repairs in-house.

Read more Duncan Aviation Aircraft Paint Services

We Have Anticipated Your Needs

There is no simple solution to keeping an aircraft airworthy. The regularly scheduled maintenance events and those that are not expected all add to the cost of doing business by air. As an aircraft operator as well as a service provider, Duncan Aviation understands the daily complexities and has already anticipated your needs before you have.

We make it our business to take the complicated puzzle of aircraft operation and ownership and make it as simple as possible for you.

The best and most economic choice for maintenance events, all the time, every time, is Duncan Aviation. The years of experience and the long list of capabilities at all of our facilities has proven that when we promise to do a job, we are promising to deliver on time, at a fair price, and with the highest quality of work.

This isn’t a random guess disguised as a promise; it is the expert opinion of team members who make it their job to know.

Tags: Engine Maintenance, Airframe Maintenance, Interior Refurbishment, Aircraft Paint

OH...FOD!  Checked Your Drawers Lately?

Posted by Diane Heiserman on Thu, Apr 14, 2016 @ 10:20 AM

FOD-small.jpgThat screwdriver that mysteriously went missing from the toolbox, a scrap of wire or a pack of Lifesavers might not look threatening. But as any A&P Tech will tell you, anything that’s somewhere it doesn’t belong sets the stage for a potentially dangerous situation. Such objects are known as FOD, and Duncan Aviation’s technicians are finding more of them more frequently.

It is common knowledge that any foreign object in, on or around an aircraft can have tragic results. Yet some of our airframe techs have discovered many of these objects during inspections across all makes and models of aircraft. Everything from small bits of trash to misplaced pieces of on-board equipment have been found trapped under floorboards and lying on top of wire bundles.

The definitions of FOD can be as varied as the objects that can cause it: Foreign Object Damage, Foreign Object Debris, etc. One thing all aviation experts agree on is that if FOD is in your aircraft or if it affects the external areas of your aircraft it can lead to an extremely serious situation. FOD comes in many forms–typically debris from other aircraft. It can be nothing more than a small rivet or any other type of object on the ramp or runway.

Tire punctures are common with runway FOD. Hopefully this type of debris is caught during pre-flight inspections and the result is only an inexpensive tire replacement and not a blowout during takeoff.

Internal FOD can result from work crews leaving an object trapped behind a panel or floorboard somewhere on the aircraft. It can even be a part of the airplane that was moved and not returned to its proper place.

During inspections, our techs have discovered items ranging from tie-raps, avionic control buttons, pencils and even an auxiliary gear handle that was lying on top of the flight control pulleys under the co-pilot floor. Any FOD trapped under floorboards can be a potential hazard to the safe operation of an aircraft. Sharp objects found lying on wire bundles, hydraulic lines, pitot static lines, etc., are especially dangerous and can have a chafing potential which can again lead to a catastrophic failure.

Real-World_FOD_033_FIN.jpgDuncan Aviation's technicians found this red Auxiliary Gear Handle (which belongs to the aircraft) sitting on top of the flight control pulleys.
Consider this fictional nightmare scenario: After a maintenance event, an auxiliary gear handle is left under the pilot’s floor lying on top of the flight control pulleys. The crew has done a thorough preflight, but does not have X-ray vision and has no idea what’s below them. They start down the runway for the flight home and just as the PNF (pilot not flying) calls V1 (the decision speed to abort the takeoff or fly) one engine quits, so the PF (pilot flying) immediately adds rudder for directional control. The auxiliary gear handle slips from its resting place due to the abnormal side loads and wedges into the rudder cables. The rudder is designed to travel a set number of degrees to give a pilot the required directional control at the speed above V1. Since the handle is now restricting the designed amount of deflection, the pilot’s only option is to reduce power on the good engine to match what rudder is available and PRAY that is enough.

Depending on the type of FOD, a loss of any system aboard an airplane is possible. This can lead to a life-threatening scenario during takeoff, flight and landing. Normally these types of FOD issues don’t arise because of the professional training and maintenance ethics of A&Ps. Vigilance to the task at hand can eliminate many forms of FOD.

When it comes to FOD, carelessness should never be tolerated and strict procedures must be followed. Duncan Aviation is extremely serious about FOD and has an inspection system in place that is strictly adhered to in order to ensure that all foreign objects, regardless of area of origination, are secured prior to panel/floor close up. At Duncan Aviation a task on or around an aircraft is not completed until FOD is eliminated. Make sure to review the FOD procedures at any maintenance facility you might choose and make sure they take FOD as seriously as they should.

Engine FOD Potentially Catastrophic

TFE731-Bird-Strike_45-184_004_FIN.jpg

Engine FOD can be the most dangerous of all FOD. Any material that rips through any engine can cause a catastrophic failure. Engine FOD is both internal and external. Internal FOD can be mitigated through the use of strict procedures. (Check to see the procedures your service provider uses.) External FOD requires proper planning and observation to eliminate.

Internal FOD may include any tool, part or anything a technician may use while servicing an engine. Rivets are common FOD elements for engines. Years ago, a chief pilot decided to test his flight crew’s FOD procedures by placing his hat inside an engine intake. Before he could warn them of his plan, they tested the engine. Several thousand dollars of damage resulted.

External FOD is much more dangerous if the aircraft is in flight. External FOD may include airborne debris such as a sand storm or volcanic ash from an eruption or even hail or ice ingestion. Be aware of FAA NOTAMs in the area of your flight plan. Also be careful when taxiing behind large aircraft as their jet blast and general size can kick up quite a bit of debris.

The damage to the TFE731 engine above was caused by a bird strike. We found damage to the fan blades, nose cowl leading edge, fan stator, and compressor impeller... just to name a few. Depending on the strike, one bird can cause more than half-a-million dollars in damages.

Tags: Engine Maintenance, Airframe Maintenance

Duncan Aviation : Aircraft Turbine Engine Services From the Beginning

Posted by Diane Heiserman on Fri, Jan 15, 2016 @ 01:45 PM

IMG_1979.gifIn The Beginning...

In 1973, Leo Sawatzki stepped off the Navy ship U.S.S. Constellation and signed on with Duncan Aviation in Lincoln, Nebraska, as a jet engine mechanic. He was prepared to service GE CJ610 and Pratt & Whitney PT6 engines. However, it wasn’t long after he arrived that Airesearch introduced a new engine, the TFE731. This engine showed lots of promise. Leo and six other Duncan Aviation turbine engine mechanics, with only a four-section wooden box filled with plugs, caps and hardware, were eager to discover and learn all they could.

Early on, as with many first-generation technologies, this new engine had some growing pains. Our engine technicians were called upon many times to provide Aircraft on Ground (AOG) services. Just by the sheer volume of hands-on, field-repair work, they discovered first-hand how the engines operated and what was needed to fix them.

Seeing an unmet need, it didn’t take long before we invested in the necessary tooling and equipment to dispatch a team to any location whenever the calls came in. And the calls did come. On a weekly basis, mechanics were sent as far away as Iceland, Argentina or Canada... or to the hangar just down the road. Their quick responses made them the go-to guys for TFE731 on-the-road engine services.

This Duncan Aviation team was the original AOG engine road crew before such crews became popular. This practice of being ready to travel at a moment’s notice is the genesis of Duncan Aviation’s Engine Rapid Response Teams (RRT). Today, our RRTs are strategically located all across the United States, able to reach an operator’s location in as little as 24 hours.

The Authorizations

We had become a reliable resource for TFE731 operators flying all over the world, proving that even a small shop from the middle of America had a worldwide impact. In 1981, we hit two milestones and received major level authorization to work on the Airesearch TPE331 and TFE731engines. These authorizations allowed all who previously relied upon us to come to their rescue during times of need to entrust their engines to us for high-level, expert Major Periodic Inspection (MPI) service.

In those early years, the Duncan Aviation engine team disassembled the engines and sent them out for repair, relying on the abilities and time schedule of others. The culture at Duncan Aviation has always been to deliver only the best, on time and at budget. Unfortunately, not every company has the same level of customer commitment. "We knew we could provide these same services better, faster and cheaper," says Leo. With that, the decision was made to invest in the research, tooling and training to bring those capabilities in-house.

Engine Services Today

Engine-Line_002.gifToday, Airesearch is now Honeywell and Duncan Aviation Engine Services has grown to include 73 licensed factory-trained turbine engine technicians working two shifts to provide line maintenance, MPIs, AOG road services and technical expertise, in support of Honeywell, Pratt & Whitney, Rolls Royce and Williams International aircraft turbine engines.

The "four-room" wooden box is now a modern 20,000-square-foot facility with 12 separate engine bays.  In 2014, we added a 4,050-square-foot engine line maintenance shop to support in-house aircraft maintenance events. This makes Duncan Aviation truly a one-stop shop for all turbine engine maintenance events.

Obtaining the maximum performance out of your engines is an art mastered by the Duncan Aviation turbine engine professionals. Generations of experience combined with investment in all Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)-authorized repair methods bring the most reliable and proven techniques to ensure performance and reliability of your engines.

Leo, now the Engine Acquisitions and Sales Manager, has seen first-hand the changes the TFE731 has gone through over the last 38 years. One thing has remained constant—Duncan Aviation has remained Duncan Aviation. The company has never changed its name, its ownership or its commitment to delivering only the best.

Years To Come

In 2015, we reached another milestone with the designation as a Honeywell AS907 (HTF 7000) Series Minor Maintenance facility.

Duncan Aviation is the only U.S.-run, family-owned company with this length of historical and technical experience on the TFE731. We are still Duncan Aviation. We have been there since the beginning. And we’ll be here for generations to come.

Tags: Engine Maintenance

New Leadership in Duncan Aviation's Engine Rapid Response Network

Posted by Diane Heiserman on Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 11:49 AM

RRT-Travel_KitDuncan Aviation’s Engine Rapid Response network has grown and is more widely dispersed than ever. With 30 technicians strategically located across the United States, the demand for AOG and scheduled support at customer locations continues to increase. And they are answering the call, making the trip and getting each customer back in the air and back on schedule.

With this continued growth, we are proud to announce the appointment of new leaders within our Engine Rapid Response (RRT) network.

Download The Engine Rapid Response Fact Sheet Now

Joe Stubbs—Atlanta, Georgia

Joe Stubbs has been with Duncan Aviation for 10 years, nine of those on the engine line at the company's headquarters in Lincoln, Neb. In 2014, he successfully launched a new Engine Rapid Response office in Long Beach, Calif., then moved on to join the Seattle RRT. Turbine Engine Service Manager James Prater says that when the Atlanta leadership opportunity became available, Stubbs was the clear choice. "Joe's flexibility, versatility and wealth of engine knowledge make him a valuable resource in our RRT network. We are happy that he has accepted this leadership opportunity in Atlanta."

For engine service and support in the Atlanta region, Joe Stubbs can be reached at +1 770.286.4410.

Mike Bruhn—Chicago, Illinois

Mike Bruhn joined the Rapid Response Team in Chicago with experience as an A&P certified technician in flight departments and repair stations on a broad spectrum of corporate jets. In his five years at Chicago, he has built a strong rapport with area operators. "We are excited to allow Mike the opportunity to continue to strengthen those relationships while serving as Team Leader and work toward his vision for growing the team and expanding its presence throughout the area," says Prater.

For engine service and support in the Chicago region, Mike Bruhn can be reached at +1 773.294.5169.

Regis Biarrieta—Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Fort Lauderdale is Duncan Aviation's largest Engine Rapid Response Team. Regis Biarrieta has taken over as the new Team Leader for the Fort Lauderdale office. Baiarrieta has been with Duncan Aviation for four years, having worked in both Atlanta and Fort Lauderdale. His prior A&P experiences include airlines, corporate jets and government contracts where he spent seven years in Spain maintaining the Spanish Air Force Presidential and Royal fleet. Prater believes these experiences along with his Venezuelan roots and multilingual ability make him a great fit for Duncan Aviation's south Florida clientele. "He is a great asset in Fort Lauderdale and will be a tremendous Team Leader."

For engine service and support in the Fort Lauderdale region, Regis Biarrieta can be reached at +1 954.410.0058.

Tags: Engine Maintenance, AOG

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